Georgian Windows

Wooden Georgian Windows

Typical UK streets highlight the arrangement of Georgian windows in facades, their glazing design and detailing, and their opening configuration – sash or casement. These windows are a great contribution to our national architecture. This is especially true of London, where most traditional street architecture and vernacular buildings depend upon basic classical rules of proportion and detailing.

Also, when knowing the historic development of window design and technology, and the impact of architecture, it is possible to see the charms of window heritage. All building structures are planned according to a number of elements – such as the environment, functionality, economics, trends or others – and this also applies to windows. Until the early 1900’s, most Georgian buildings were designed by the laws of classical proportion, adopting the features of the Renaissance movement across Europe. Symmetrically arranged windows, centrally positioned doors, vertical emphasis to rectangular window opens, and elegantly detailed window glazing that reflected the dimensions of the building. All of this formed a memorable coherent ‘national architecture’ that lasted until late 1950’s when modernist fashion strongly took hold and changed the viewpoint about how buildings should look.

Refinement of Style

During the eighteenth century, Georgian sliding sash window design progressed in refinement as attempts tried to improve the capture of natural light coming into the rooms by minimising the amount of timber to glass, hence enhancing the field of view to the outside. As a result, the elements of the sash profile, the meeting rails, stiles and glazing bars turned into slimmer and more delicate frames.

As a definition of classical design, windows were thought to be seen as voids within even facades, producing reduced glazing bars and other components intended to be virtually invisible with the use of a dark paint colour. Georgian windows design became longer, extending almost to floor level in most influential public rooms. Small square glass panes were replaced by rectangular panes that followed the proportions of the window as a whole.