Glossary Of Window Components

New to window talk? Let Marvin Architectural help you with the window parts and hardware terminology.

What Are Those Window Parts Called?

15 September 2017

Understanding Window Terminology

This short guide will highlight some of the key window parts and hardware that you should be familiar with when you’re planning on replacing or installing new high-quality windows.

Below are diagrams showing you the different parts of the most common two window designs in the UK market.

The Anatomy Of A Sliding Sash Window

Sliding sash windows (or double hung windows) are one of the most common types of windows present on historic buildings in the UK, especially those of the early 18th and 19th centuries. Let’s have a look at the common window terminology surrounding the sliding sash.

 

The Main Window Parts

  1. Frame: There are three components to the frame:
    • (1a) Head across the top
    • (1b) Side Jambs down each side
    • (1c) Sill across the bottom
  2. Glazing: The glass in a window is called glazing and a range of options are available.
  3. Glazing Bars: The wood or aluminium clad wood profiles that gives the appearance of subdivision of the glazing
  4. Top Sash: The upper component of a sash window (Can be fixed or operable)
  5. Bottom Sash: The lower component of a sash window
  6. Meeting Rail: The rail of each sash that meets at a horizontal level when both sash parts are close

Hardware Terminology

  1. Sash Lifts (or Finger Lifts): The small handles at the bottom of the sash that allows you to operate the window with ease.
  2. Sash Lock: A lock device attached to the meeting rail of the sashes.
  3. Balance Tubes: The mechanism that allows the window to stay into a desired opening position
    • Weighted: A more traditional balance mechanism which features a chord and pulley.
    • Spring Loaded: A more contemporary balance mechanism that fits neatly into the building profile and which is invisible to the naked eye.

Find Out More About Marvin’s Sliding Sash Windows

Learn more about the features of Marvin’s finely crafted wood sliding sash windows or low-maintenance aluminium clad wood sliding sash windows below. Click on a window to find out more.

Wooden Sliding Sash Windows
  Aluminium Clad Wood Sliding Sash Window

The Anatomy Of A Casement Window

Casement windows are hinged at the side and can come either in pairs or on their own within a window frame. These windows are opened and closed with a crank or push-out handle. Let’s have a look at the main window terminology.

Casement window terminology diagram

The Main Window Parts

  1. Frame: Identical to the sliding sash window, there are three components to the frame:
    • (1a) Head across the top
    • (1b) Side Jambs down each side
    • (1c) Sill across the bottom
  2. Glazing: The glass in a window is called glazing.
  3. Glazing Bars: The wood or aluminium clad wood profiles that gives the appearance of subdivision of the glazing

Hardware Terminology

  1. Crank Handle: A crank & turn operational handle that allows for a smooth opening transition.
  2. Push-Out Handle: A traditional style handle for casement windows.
  3. Lock Lever :An adjustable lock system installed on the operative panel(s) to enhance security and performance.
  4. Sash Limiter: A safety mechanism that allows you to safely open your window on a windy day.

Find Out More About Marvin’s Casement Windows

Learn more about the features of Marvin’s ultimate wood casement windows or low-maintenance aluminium clad wood casement windows below. Click on a window to find out more.

Wooden Casement Windows
Aluminium Clad Wood Casement Windows With French Vanilla Finish

Other Window Operational Design Terms

Hover over the following window terms to see the design.

  • Awning Window
  • Bay Window
  • Fixed Window
  • Special Shape Window

Still Not Sure What It’s Called?

Contact us today and we’ll be more than happy to help you with any window or door terminology that you’re confused about.

Contact Us Here

 

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